Avoiding Surgery with Smart Decisions

Did you know that two of the largest insurance companies in America require four weeks of conservative treatment be provided before surgery is an option for neck and back conditions?  What this tells me is that your worst time of pain (the first four weeks) is also the worst time to make a poor decision of having irreversible emergency surgery.  Today’s Ounce of Prevention is geared at setting you up for success after low back pain occurs. Ice is your […]

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OsteoArthritis Prevention

The usual thought is that arthritis (osteo- not rheumatoid or other inflammatory arthritides) is something everyone gets as they age or is an inheritable disease.  Research is finding out more and more that arthritis is highly affected by how our joints are loaded.  That’s right, you and I, much like “an apple a day” can have the power to “keep the hip, knee or shoulder replacement surgeon away.” A 2004 study on knees found that a lack of ligament stability negatively […]

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“Popping” Yourself: Why not!!??

If you or your child is “popping” their neck or back on a consistent basis, please read this Ounce of Prevention!  I have heard many arguments from patients who are addicted to popping their joints from “it feels so good” to “look how much better I can turn.”  The reality is that if you feel like you need to twist or pull a joint until it pops, something is wrong.  If you can lean your head to the side lightly […]

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Saving Your Knees

Knee pain is the third most common complaint seen in my office, behind low back and shoulder pain.  Statistics show that out of every four people, one suffers from knee pain.  Today’s ounce of prevention will focus on a few of the problems and tests to see if your knees need help, because pain is a late indicator, after damage has been done. If I were a knee, I would be frustrated because my health is totally dependent on the […]

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Important Questions About Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

There are many issues that can cause tingling in the arm and hand.  In this edition of An Ounce of Prevention I would like to offer information that will keep patients from having unnecessary carpal tunnel surgery. If you have nerve type symptoms in your arm (i.e. burning, tingling, numbness), your answers to the following questions will help reveal if you have carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS): 1. Do the symptoms follow the median nerve’s pattern (the only nerve that passes […]

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The Psoas: Magic for the Low Back

There’s a hip muscle with a really weird name, that few ever address, but many people have real problems with.  It’s called the Psoas muscle.  Google it if you like.  There is a psoas major, psoas minor and a close neighbor, the iliacus.  These muscles lie on the front of the hip and low back.  They shorten when we sit, and most people sit…a lot.  When they get stuck in a tightened position, we feel back pain in the form of […]

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A Conservative Approach to TMJ Problems

The TMJ is the joint between the jaw or mandible and the temporal bone of the skull (hence temporomandibular joint).  It is one of the most mobile and complex joints in the body when used to its max range during eating and yawning and often becomes dysfunctional.  Dysfunction shows up as pain in the jaw or face, popping or clicking during chewing, limitation of jaw movement, and even headaches/migraines. You can help prevent your own jaw problems in a few […]

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The Throwing Athlete’s Shoulder

The Throwing Athlete’s Shoulder Surgeons, physical therapists, and Major League Baseball athletic training coaches from literally across the world annually present the latest strategies in preventing and treating injuries in the pitcher’s elbow and shoulder, from little leaguers to pro players.  Today’s article will go over key points from the conference in building a healthy throwing athlete. First, the rotator cuff, shoulder blade and trunk.  The rotator cuff’s job is to rotate the (ball and socket) shoulder joint but even more […]

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